Setting Redirects When Replacing a Site

If you already have a website, launching a new site will break many or all of the links and bookmarks to the pages on your old site.

This tutorial is for people who had an existing URL and requested domain mapping to retain that URL. See Replacing an Existing Site for more information.

Complete these steps for each redirect you wish to set:

  1. Go to Dashboard > Tools Safe Redirect Manager.
  2. Click the button Create Redirect Rule at the top of the screen.
  3. Redirect from: Enter the part of the source URL after .edu, including the forward slash (/).
  4. Redirect to:
    1. Another page on the same site: Enter the part of the source URL after .edu, including the forward slash (/).
      1. If that doesn’t work, enter the full URL of the destination page.
    2. Page on a different domain: full URL of the destination page
  5. HTTP Status Code: 301 Moved Permanently
  6. Publish button in the top right corner.
  7. Check to make sure your redirect works. Open a new tab/window. In the address bar, enter your site address, e.g. abc.wustl.edu, followed by what you put in the Redirect to field, e.g. /education. If you’re redirected to the anticipated destination, hooray! If not, go back and adjust as needed.

Examples of redirects

Example 1

  • You had a page called “Classes.” Its URL was abc.wustl.edu/classes.
  • The URL on your new website is abc.wustl.edu/undergraduate-classes.
  • Redirect from: /classes
  • Redirect to: /undergraduate-classes

Example 1

  While logged in to your site, you may see the sites.wustl.edu/* URL in the address bar; do not be alarmed. Only you can see this, not your site visitors. 

Example 2

  • You had a page called “Undergraduate” that was a subpage of “Degree Programs.” Its URL was abc.wustl.edu/degree-programs/undergraduate.
  • The URL on your new website is abc.wustl.edu/education/undergraduate.
  • Redirect to: /degree-programs/undergraduate
  • Redirect from: /education/undergraduate

Example 2

Example 3: URL ending in .aspx, .htm, etc.

  • You had a page called “Labs” that was a subpage of “Research.” Its URL was abc.wustl.edu/research/labs.aspx.
  • The URL on your WashU Sites website is sites.wustl.edu/abc/research/labs, which is now equal to abc.wustl.edu/research/labs.

Example 3

Example 3.1: Troubleshooting

Sometimes, putting the truncated URL in Redirect to doesn’t work. If that’s the case, use the entire URL of the destination URL.

Example 3.1: If the truncated URL doesn’t produce the desired redirect, enter the full destination URL in the ‘redirect to’ field.

Example 4: Redirecting to another site

If you’re redirecting a page that is or was on your website to a completely separate website, you must include the entire destination URL in “redirect to,” including the http:// or https://.

Think of it like this: If you wanted to send a letter to someone on campus, you could send it via campus mail using just their name and campus box number. However, if you wanted to mail a letter to someone off campus, you’d need to use their full address.

  • You had a page on your site called “Volunteering.” Its URL was abc.wustl.edu/volunteering.
  • You want all traffic to that page to redirect to another site about volunteering, https://volunteeropps.wustl.edu.
  • Redirect from: /volunteering
  • Redirect to: https://volunteeropps.wustl.edu

Example 4

Example 5: Redirecting to a page on another site

Same as redirecting to another site: Include the entire URL of the destination in “redirect to” including the http:// or https://.

  • You had a page on your site called “Volunteering.” Its URL was abc.wustl.edu/volunteering.
  • You want all traffic to that page to redirect to a page about volunteering on another site .
  • Redirect from: /volunteering
  • Redirect to: https://otherwebsite.wustl.edu/volunteering

Example 5