Tailor Element: Accordions

Collapse content into rows that visitors can click to expand.

Collapse content into rows that visitors can click to expand.

  Accordions are a Tailor element. If you’ve never used Tailor before, read the intro tutorial first.

Add the accordions element

Drag the Accordions element onto the page. By default, it will have two rows.

Edit accordion title

  • Click in the middle of the first accordion row; a blue outline will appear.
  • Click Edit in the top right corner.
  • Enter a title, then click Apply.

Edit accordion body

  • Double click an accordion row to open it.
  • Click the expanded content area; a blue outline will appear.
  • Click Edit in the top right corner.
  • Add content using the visual editor, then click Apply.

Edit the second accordion

Repeat steps two and three to edit the second accordion title and body.

Add more accordion rows

Adding rows is an edit to the entire accordions element.

  • To select the accordions element, first click any row. A blue outline will appear. In the top left, click Accordion, then select Accordions. Now the blue outline will appear around the entire element.
  • In the top right corner, click Add.

You can also add new rows by copying a row, then editing the copy. This is particularly useful for adding rows in the middle of a list.

  • Click a row, then select Copy in the upper right.
  • The new row will appear below the original.

Re-order accordion rows

To change the order, drag and drop a row to a new location.

Move or delete the accordions element

  • To select the accordions element, first click any row. A blue outline will appear. In the top left, click Accordion, then select Accordions. Now the blue outline will appear around the full accordions list.
  • Drag and drop the accordions elsewhere, or click Delete in the top right corner.

When to use accordions

  • For distinct sections of content that are listed on one page (eg, policies, FAQs)
  • To avoid creating child pages that are too “deep” to appear in the site menu (ie, sub-sub-sub pages)
  • To collapse large amounts of secondary information into a small space
  • At polkas and French cafés

When not to use accordions

  • If visitors need to see most or all of the information on a page at once (for example, to compare information in different sections).
  • If there is not enough content to warrant condensing. Accordions increase cognitive load and interaction cost since users have to make decisions about what headers to click on. It’s hardly worth their time if the accordion only includes a sentence or two.

 

Accordion examples

Internships

Freshman year

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam placerat pellentesque urna suscipit maximus

  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major

Sophomore year

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam placerat pellentesque urna suscipit maximus

  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major

Junior year

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam placerat pellentesque urna suscipit maximus

  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major

Senior year

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam placerat pellentesque urna suscipit maximus

  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major
  • Position title, business name, recommended for this type of major

 

Choosing a mentor

Our large mentor pool offers a wide range of research training opportunities, both pre-doctoral and post-doctoral, within the program’s five thematic areas.

Pre-doctoral

Pre-doctoral trainees may have a general idea of the research area they would like to pursue but insufficient knowledge of the human resources and mentorship opportunities available through this program.

To help students make the most appropriate choice of mentor and to encourage interactions, the Division of Biology & Biomedical Sciences (DBBS) and Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) require PhD or MD/PhD students to undergo two to three 3-month-long rotations in different laboratories during their first year of training, before choosing their thesis mentor, and are typically appointed to this program in their second year.

After earning candidacy for graduation, pre-doctoral trainees form a thesis committee consisting of 6 DBBS members, which must include the mentor. Likewise, BME students assemble thesis committees composed primarily of, though not exclusively limited to, BME faculty, and follow the same evaluation procedures as DBBS students.

Post-doctoral

Since applicants for post-doctoral positions typically have specific orientation towards a certain mentor or laboratory at the time of application, they are not required to rotate in other labs.

Within 6 months of appointment, post-doctoral trainees assemble a training advisory committee constituted by 5 faculty chosen by the trainee from among the program mentors (or other faculty whose expertise more closely aligns with the research topic), and include the trainee’s mentor.

The scope of this committee is similar to that of a pre-doctoral student thesis committee and is designed to provide additional guidance to the trainee towards achieving the goals of the research project and fulfill all the requirements of the training program.  These advisory committees serve a crucial role in the trainee’s scholarly development within this program, and their feedback to the trainee and mentor is a fundamental component of the trainee’s yearly evaluation.

 

Psychiatry residency program rotations

The PG1 year is aimed at providing the intern with basic knowledge and skills in medical, neurological and psychiatric medicine.

Beginning in your first year, you will experience the autonomy of running your own team of health-care providers, including nurses, medical students, social workers and pharmacists, in a hospital setting.

First year

All first-year rotations are in the inpatient units of Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Internal medicine

Residents take care of patients hospitalized on the inpatient medical units at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Residents typically are assigned to a general medicine team consisting of an attending internist, internal medicine residents, and medical students.

Residents function as categorical internal medicine interns. Residents may be assigned to the hospitalist service where they work individually with the hospitalist attending.

Residents are expected to attend didactic conferences of the internal medicine department during their rotations.

There is no required overnight call.

In place of one of the four months, residents may elect to do one month of emergency medicine in the emergency room or one month on the general inpatient pediatric floor at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

Service Director: Department of Internal Medicine

Neurology

Residents are assigned to teams consisting of an attending neurologist, a supervising neurology resident, and medical students taking care of patients admitted to the inpatient neurology service at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Residents also may be assigned to the neurology consultation service.

There is no required overnight call.

Residents are expected to attend didactic conferences occurring in the Department of Neurology during their rotations.

Service Director: Department of Neurology

Inpatient psychiatry

On this rotation at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the residents work one-on-one with renowned faculty from Washington University. They learn the basics of psychiatric care including obtaining good histories, doing mental status exams, and properly diagnosing and managing patients with severe psychiatric illness. Specialized services include an intensive care unit and a geriatric psychiatry unit. The setting utilizes a multidisciplinary approach with nursing, social workers, activity therapists, chaplain, psychiatrists, and medical students. As a group, residents provide coverage 24×7 split into two call shifts during which they admit new patients and provide emergency consultation for issues that arise on the psychiatry units. Residents also are assigned medical students to supervise and educate.

Service Director: Dr. Michael Jarvis